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The Animals Glow


 
 

I’m fascinated by the appearance of bioluminescence and biofluorescene in nature. It appears at first as something unnatural, like neon tubes, but it has a natural explanation. In this work series I have portrayed  animals, which all have glowing characteristics. Bioluminescence is inner chemical reaction that helps creatures, such as fire flies, krill and some fish, flash light to communicate. Biofluorescence occurs when an organism absorbs light from an outside source, such as the sun, transforms it and then reemits it.

 

The glowworm Lampyris Noctiluca, who is in family with the firefly, uses bioluminiscence for an evolutionary purpose in order to attract mates.

The giant cockroach Lucihormetica Luckae has spots inhabited by bacteria that glow as defense by mimicing the apperance of the toxic click beetle that emits light at the same wawelength.

The small 4 cm long squid Abralia Veranyi has 550 light-producing organs on the underside called photophores to make it less visible appearing as a dark silhouette when viewed from below working as a kind of counter-illumination, a form of camouflage.

The Hawksbill Turtle uses biofluorescene to blend into the reefs.

 

The luminescence color adds a duality to the work controlled by the level of light. With the use of  UV light the glowing effect can be seen at any time, but in twilight/darkness the works will emit the light they have absorbed during the day/via electric lighting.

The intention is that the visual impression from the glowing shades will add a different feeling of time to the works, a kind of timelessness, of relatedness. Of being-of.

 

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